Why one woman is walking almost 2,400 miles to the US Capitol

For family and friends of Ella Mae Begay, the nightmare continues. “All tell me is ‘we’re still investigating. We’re fighting. We’re trying to do everything we can to solve the case,'” Seraphine Warren, niece of Begay, said. The 62-year-old Navajo woman went missing on June 15, 2021, from her home in Sweetwater, Arizona.Yet despite the time passed, there are still no answers.Warren said it’s an issue only fueled by limited resources and a lack of communication between local and federal agencies.”I’m really bothered with just how the process is, and how slow it’s going,” she said. “I don’t still see that sense of urgency. I still feel like I’m running around frantically trying to look for my aunt.”Begay’s disappearance is especially hard for relatives like Warren. Since her aunt went missing, Warren has been a key advocate for families with similar situations. She’s walked a dozen trips to demand change from local leaders. Sister station KOAT caught up with her in February 2021 during her most recent trek to the Navajo Nation capital. There, she met with President Jonathan Nez. However, this time around, Warren is thinking bigger and farther: Washington, D.C. “During one of my prayers, that’s what I spoke of is, I’m going to do this walk to D.C. because I’m not the only one that’s dealing with this,” she said. Over the next few weeks, Warren will be making her way to the nation’s Capitol, by foot. She’ll start at her aunt’s home in Arizona, then make the long walk. Just days before, preparations for the trip turned emotional for Begay’s niece.”Why am I going around, in each room, looking for what to take when my aunt didn’t get that chance?” she said. “When I was leaving, I hugged my kids. I was telling them where I’m going to be at. My aunt didn’t get that chance.”Through her cross-country journey, Warren plans to pique the interest of federal legislators and persuade leaders to put more pressure on the law enforcement agencies handling cases of missing and murdered Indigenous people. “When a Texas shooting happened, they pretty much put the police on the spot. If they mishandle something here, they should take accountability and say, ‘hey, we did this wrong.’ They should say, ‘hey, we were lacking this much police force.’ I mean, the police officers and leaders should know what is going on themselves,” Warren said.She also hopes to be a voice for other grieving families, some of whom she plans to meet along the way.”I feel like this walk is going to grab a lot of people’s attention in any way they could relate,” she said. “It’s going to happen. The pain that I’m probably going to endure with my soreness, I know somebody’s going to relate.”Doing what she knows best. “I don’t know what I’m doing, but I just need attention on this and somebody needs to do something,” Warren said. Begay’s niece isn’t sure when she’s expected to get to Washington, D.C.She said the trip will take her roughly 779 hours, and she’ll walk almost 2,400 miles.Watch the video above for the full story.

For family and friends of Ella Mae Begay, the nightmare continues.

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“All [authorities] tell me is ‘we’re still investigating. We’re fighting. We’re trying to do everything we can to solve the case,'” Seraphine Warren, niece of Begay, said.

The 62-year-old Navajo woman went missing on June 15, 2021, from her home in Sweetwater, Arizona.

why a navajo woman is walking almost 2,400 miles to the nation's capitol

Hearst OwnedSeraphine Warren

Pictured: Ella Mae Begay

Yet despite the time passed, there are still no answers.

Warren said it’s an issue only fueled by limited resources and a lack of communication between local and federal agencies.

“I’m really bothered with just how the process is, and how slow it’s going,” she said. “I don’t still see that sense of urgency. I still feel like I’m running around frantically trying to look for my aunt.”

why a navajo woman is walking almost 2,400 miles to the nation's capitol

Hearst OwnedSeraphine Warren

Pictured: Ella Mae Begay

Begay’s disappearance is especially hard for relatives like Warren.

Since her aunt went missing, Warren has been a key advocate for families with similar situations.

She’s walked a dozen trips to demand change from local leaders.

Sister station KOAT caught up with her in February 2021 during her most recent trek to the Navajo Nation capital. There, she met with President Jonathan Nez.

However, this time around, Warren is thinking bigger and farther: Washington, D.C.

“During one of my prayers, that’s what I spoke of is, I’m going to do this walk to D.C. because I’m not the only one that’s dealing with this,” she said.

Over the next few weeks, Warren will be making her way to the nation’s Capitol, by foot.

She’ll start at her aunt’s home in Arizona, then make the long walk.

Just days before, preparations for the trip turned emotional for Begay’s niece.

“Why am I going around, in each room, looking for what to take when my aunt didn’t get that chance?” she said. “When I was leaving, I hugged my kids. I was telling them where I’m going to be at. My aunt didn’t get that chance.”

Through her cross-country journey, Warren plans to pique the interest of federal legislators and persuade leaders to put more pressure on the law enforcement agencies handling cases of missing and murdered Indigenous people.

When a Texas shooting happened, they pretty much put the police on the spot. If they mishandle something here, they should take accountability and say, ‘hey, we did this wrong.’ They should say, ‘hey, we were lacking this much police force.’ I mean, the police officers and leaders should know what is going on themselves,” Warren said.

She also hopes to be a voice for other grieving families, some of whom she plans to meet along the way.

“I feel like this walk is going to grab a lot of people’s attention in any way they could relate,” she said. “It’s going to happen. The pain that I’m probably going to endure with my soreness, I know somebody’s going to relate.”

Doing what she knows best.

I don’t know what I’m doing, but I just need attention on this and somebody needs to do something,” Warren said.

Begay’s niece isn’t sure when she’s expected to get to Washington, D.C.

She said the trip will take her roughly 779 hours, and she’ll walk almost 2,400 miles.

Watch the video above for the full story.

Contributed by local news sources

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