‘This could mean our future’: Family needs help saving home for teen with cerebral palsy

A Nebraska family said they may lose their home and it’s custom-built for their teenager with cerebral palsy.The family said they’ll have to sell or face foreclosure.They add that finding the right home is almost impossible and hope the community can help.Inside the home, you’ll find 14-year-old Kayden Cotten doing what just about any other 14-year-old would be: watching sports.Cotten just graduated from eighth grade with his sights set on high school.“He wants to go to Burke,” said Zennie Zarek, Cotten’s aunt.For the sports, of course.But this 14-year-old has taken on more than most already in his life.Diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a baby, his family knew his life would be hard.“I want to be looked at as a normal human being,” Kayden Cotten said.His grandmother adopted him as a child and moved him back to Nebraska in this home.It caught fire in 2016, but that allowed them to remodel with full handicap access.“It’s all custom, with him in thought. And her goal was to pay it off and it was his home forever,” Zarek said.Cotten’s grandmother died a year and a half ago.His aunt, Zennie Zarek, took over guardianship and the home.”I’m new at this, I’m a new guardian, I’m new at all of this. I’m learning,” she said.But it’s become too much.“I can’t afford to make the payments, the payments she was in (on the house) and still eat,” Zarek said.They said they owe around $100,000 and the bank is preparing to foreclose.Some of Zarek’s siblings want to sell so they don’t lose the equity.Now they have a notice to vacate by July 6 and packing boxes litter the dining room.“Not only are we being kicked out of here, but I can’t find one. If anybody has looked online or anywhere, there’s no houses to be had,” Zarek said. “There’s nothing to buy that’s a ranch, or to rent.”Zarek said many apartments aren’t handicap-accessible either.Cotten worries about his future.“The thing I’m scared of most? I go to a new house, I don’t know where I’m going. I can’t do stuff as independently,” Cotton said.They hope others can help keep him in his home.”This could possibly mean our future, my future. I really don’t want to leave this house because I feel like it’s my best chance of being successful,” Cotton said.“Help. I just need help,” Zarek said.Zarek said Monday, that the electricity was shut off by request of the estate. She paid hundreds to get it back on in 100-degree heat.They’ve started a GoFundMe (click to go to website) to help pay for the house, and they need a lawyer to help them navigate probate courts and loan refinancing.Watch the video above for the full story.

A Nebraska family said they may lose their home and it’s custom-built for their teenager with cerebral palsy.

The family said they’ll have to sell or face foreclosure.

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They add that finding the right home is almost impossible and hope the community can help.

Inside the home, you’ll find 14-year-old Kayden Cotten doing what just about any other 14-year-old would be: watching sports.

Cotten just graduated from eighth grade with his sights set on high school.

“He wants to go to Burke,” said Zennie Zarek, Cotten’s aunt.

For the sports, of course.

But this 14-year-old has taken on more than most already in his life.

Diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a baby, his family knew his life would be hard.

“I want to be looked at as a normal human being,” Kayden Cotten said.

His grandmother adopted him as a child and moved him back to Nebraska in this home.

It caught fire in 2016, but that allowed them to remodel with full handicap access.

“It’s all custom, with him in thought. And her goal was to pay it off and it was his home forever,” Zarek said.

Cotten’s grandmother died a year and a half ago.

His aunt, Zennie Zarek, took over guardianship and the home.

“I’m new at this, I’m a new guardian, I’m new at all of this. I’m learning,” she said.

But it’s become too much.

“I can’t afford to make the payments, the payments she was in (on the house) and still eat,” Zarek said.

They said they owe around $100,000 and the bank is preparing to foreclose.

Some of Zarek’s siblings want to sell so they don’t lose the equity.

Now they have a notice to vacate by July 6 and packing boxes litter the dining room.

“Not only are we being kicked out of here, but I can’t find one. If anybody has looked online or anywhere, there’s no houses to be had,” Zarek said. “There’s nothing to buy that’s a ranch, or to rent.”

Zarek said many apartments aren’t handicap-accessible either.

Cotten worries about his future.

“The thing I’m scared of most? I go to a new house, I don’t know where I’m going. I can’t do stuff as independently,” Cotton said.

They hope others can help keep him in his home.

“This could possibly mean our future, my future. I really don’t want to leave this house because I feel like it’s my best chance of being successful,” Cotton said.

“Help. I just need help,” Zarek said.

Zarek said Monday, that the electricity was shut off by request of the estate. She paid hundreds to get it back on in 100-degree heat.

They’ve started a GoFundMe (click to go to website) to help pay for the house, and they need a lawyer to help them navigate probate courts and loan refinancing.

Watch the video above for the full story.

Contributed by local news sources

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