‘Significantly stressed’: Cal ISO says demand for power is as high as summer of 2017, expects it to increase

Peninsula Premier Admin

As the state’s power grid operator ask Californians to conserve power for a fifth day in a row, the office of emergency services says the demand for power is as high as in 2017.Video above: Weather forecast for September 4, 2022Cal ISO, the California Independent System Operator, announced on Saturday it would extend its Flex Alert into Sunday. Sunday will be the fourth consecutive day of requests for voluntary cutbacks during the late afternoon and evening hours to balance supply and demand as millions of residents endure the triple-digit temperatures.”On Thursday evening, we had the highest demand for power we’ve seen since September of 2017 and those last few days are likely to be a dress rehearsal for what’s going to be much more significantly stressed conditions here as we get into the heart of the weekend,” said Elliot Mainzer, Cal ISO president. Cal ISO said the demand for electricity will escalate as we see even hotter temperatures on Labor Day and the following days.In August 2020, a record heat wave and an Oregon wildfire caused two consecutive nights of rolling blackouts, affecting millions of people across California. Cal ISO said on Saturday that the stress on the power grid right now is “roughly the equivalent” of what they saw in 2020.It expects to see all-time highs to be hit on Tuesday when Central Valley temperatures are expected to hit 112. The grid is forecasted to hit 49,000 megawatts on Tuesday, Cal ISO said in a statement. The current all-time high of power usage was set in July 2006 with 50,270 megawatts being used. Saturday’s forecasted peak is expected to hit 44,823 megawatts, according to Cal ISO.”We really appreciate the efforts of consumers so far, and we’re going to be asking for more and it’s going to be a sustained effort,” Mainzer said. To help the grid, people are voluntarily asked to conserve power between 4 and 9 p.m. during a Flex Alert. Here are things you can do to conserve energy during a flex alertSet the thermostat at 78 degrees or higher, if health permitsAvoid using major appliancesTurn off unnecessary lightsUse fans for coolingUnplug unused items So far this week, there have not been any unplanned outages reported in relation to excessive use of energy.This week, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order meant to ramp up the state’s energy supply temporarily by relaxing rules aimed at curbing air pollution and global warming gases. | Read More | Gov. Newsom signs executive order to ramp up electricity supply to the state-The Associated Press contributed to this report.

As the state’s power grid operator ask Californians to conserve power for a fifth day in a row, the office of emergency services says the demand for power is as high as in 2017.

Video above: Weather forecast for September 4, 2022

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Cal ISO, the California Independent System Operator, announced on Saturday it would extend its Flex Alert into Sunday. Sunday will be the fourth consecutive day of requests for voluntary cutbacks during the late afternoon and evening hours to balance supply and demand as millions of residents endure the triple-digit temperatures.

“On Thursday evening, we had the highest demand for power we’ve seen since September of 2017 and those last few days are likely to be a dress rehearsal for what’s going to be much more significantly stressed conditions here as we get into the heart of the weekend,” said Elliot Mainzer, Cal ISO president.

Cal ISO said the demand for electricity will escalate as we see even hotter temperatures on Labor Day and the following days.

In August 2020, a record heat wave and an Oregon wildfire caused two consecutive nights of rolling blackouts, affecting millions of people across California.

Cal ISO said on Saturday that the stress on the power grid right now is “roughly the equivalent” of what they saw in 2020.

It expects to see all-time highs to be hit on Tuesday when Central Valley temperatures are expected to hit 112. The grid is forecasted to hit 49,000 megawatts on Tuesday, Cal ISO said in a statement.

The current all-time high of power usage was set in July 2006 with 50,270 megawatts being used. Saturday’s forecasted peak is expected to hit 44,823 megawatts, according to Cal ISO.

“We really appreciate the efforts of consumers so far, and we’re going to be asking for more and it’s going to be a sustained effort,” Mainzer said.

To help the grid, people are voluntarily asked to conserve power between 4 and 9 p.m. during a Flex Alert.

Here are things you can do to conserve energy during a flex alert

  • Set the thermostat at 78 degrees or higher, if health permits
  • Avoid using major appliances
  • Turn off unnecessary lights
  • Use fans for cooling
  • Unplug unused items

So far this week, there have not been any unplanned outages reported in relation to excessive use of energy.

This week, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order meant to ramp up the state’s energy supply temporarily by relaxing rules aimed at curbing air pollution and global warming gases.

| Read More | Gov. Newsom signs executive order to ramp up electricity supply to the state


-The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Contributed by local news sources

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