Nation’s largest grocery store chain says shoppers are buying less and switching to store brands

Hi. Yeah, as we’ve been reporting prices are on fire, the highest inflation since 1981. And groceries are near the top of the list, you’re feeling it, you’re feeling it at the grocery store and you feel helpless. But there is *** way you can beat this record inflation at the grocery store today with prices spiking from the bread aisle to produce two paper goods, experts say there is *** fix buying in bulk and we’re not talking about just going to Costco, you can do it wherever you grocery shop by doing some quick math right in the aisle. What you really want to know is what am I paying for? How much is each item in the package? Right, so you got to do *** little math but it’s actually really easy. Right? So for example strawberry pop tarts, right? There are eight of them in here. Eight in this small little pack, these go for $2.18. So what you want to do is do $2.18 divided by how many pop tarts? There are eight. And when you do the calculator math, you see that you’re paying 27 cents per pop tart. Ok, That’s what you’re actually paying 27 cents per pop tart. But if you come down here to the the big value pack, right, There are 48 pop tarts in here And this costs $10.73. So once again we pull out the calculator boop boop boop boop boop right? And we take 1073 Divided by 48 pop tarts. And we get our answer, we only pay 22 cents per pop tart here. five cent difference. Not huge. But that adds up. If your family likes pop tarts, next, don’t get stumped by measurements. Not every package has *** certain number of items in it that you can count. Right, cornflakes for example, I’m not going to do the math. How many cornflakes are in here and how much each cornflake costs? We’re going to go by the weight. Right? So there are 9.6 ounces in here. We want to know how much we’re paying per ounce. Right? So these are $3.13 for this regular sized cornflakes. Right? So we’re going to take the price $3.13 and divided by the number of ounces. Okay, you’re gonna do the same thing right over here, This is the mega size. Look at this. The mega sized cornflakes buying in bulk will get this 1 25.2 ounces. And this one will cost you $5.23. So, beep beep beep. We did the math for you. And again, we divided the price by the ounces. You’re paying 12 cents more per ounce when you buy the small 1 12 cents per ounce. It’s *** lot. But here’s where we saw the biggest difference. Yeah, this one’s nuts. And we’re over the paper towel. I’ll So, okay, so for this bounty paper towel. Two rolls, two rolls here, going for $4. You can see it here, $4.87 for the tupac for the bulk right over here. This comes with 12 rolls, 12 rolls in here. Same product, it’s going for $20.98. So we did the math For this. You’re paying $2.44 per roll. But for the bulk for the bulk, you’re only paying *** dollar 75 per roll. That means there is *** 69 cent difference per roll. You know, you’re gonna have to buy more paper towels anyway. So buy in bulk and save *** lot of money. And by the way, if you have the freezer space, you can even buy meat, bread and cheese and bulk. They can last believe it or not, up to three months in the freezer. We’re going to put all of this information and some more helpful tips to save money on groceries on my website. Right now, head over there, Rawson Reports dot com back to you

Advertisement

Nation’s largest grocery store chain says shoppers are buying less and switching to store brands

Decades-high inflation is changing U.S. consumers’ grocery habits.Kroger, the nation’s largest grocery store chain, said Thursday that budget-constrained shoppers were buying fewer items in stores, favoring Kroger’s cheaper store brands instead of name brands, and switching from beef to pork.”Rising inflation has consumers rethinking their shopping and eating habits,” Kroger CEO Rodney McMullen said on a call with analysts. “We are seeing different shopping behaviors based on how individual customers are experiencing the current inflationary environment.”Kroger is the latest major chain to highlight consumer shifts in response to rising prices for food, gas, rent and other goods and services.Record gas prices drove inflation to 8.6% for the 12 months ending in May, according to the latest Consumer Price Index, the government’s main inflation measure. Prices for food purchased to eat at home rose 11.9%, the largest 12-month increase since 1979, with eggs up 32.2%, milk up 15.9% and poultry up 16.6%.The typical U.S. household is spending about $460 more every month than they did last year to purchase the same basket of goods and services, said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody’s Analytics.Walmart, the largest retailer in the United States, said some consumers were switching from buying gallons of milk to half-gallons. Walmart customers are also increasingly buying store brands.Dollar General, the largest U.S. dollar store chain, is seeing its core customers — those with household incomes under $40,000 a year — “start to shop more intentionally,” CEO Todd Vasos said on an earnings call last month.Gas prices at $5 a gallon are leading some customers to focus on driving to stores located closest to their homes, Vasos added. This is an advantage for Dollar General, which has around 19,000 stores and is often the only retailer in some rural towns.Dollar General plans to add more $1 items as well as lower-priced, private-label brands to its shelves, the better to appeal to cash-strapped shoppers.Other discount chains also say they’re attracting new customers seeking cheaper alternatives.”Consumers are clearly feeling pinched by inflation and looking to stretch their grocery dollar,” R.J. Sheedy, president of Grocery Outlet, said last month. “We have seen more new customers shopping us.”

Decades-high inflation is changing U.S. consumers’ grocery habits.

Kroger, the nation’s largest grocery store chain, said Thursday that budget-constrained shoppers were buying fewer items in stores, favoring Kroger’s cheaper store brands instead of name brands, and switching from beef to pork.

Advertisement

“Rising inflation has consumers rethinking their shopping and eating habits,” Kroger CEO Rodney McMullen said on a call with analysts. “We are seeing different shopping behaviors based on how individual customers are experiencing the current inflationary environment.”

Kroger is the latest major chain to highlight consumer shifts in response to rising prices for food, gas, rent and other goods and services.

Record gas prices drove inflation to 8.6% for the 12 months ending in May, according to the latest Consumer Price Index, the government’s main inflation measure. Prices for food purchased to eat at home rose 11.9%, the largest 12-month increase since 1979, with eggs up 32.2%, milk up 15.9% and poultry up 16.6%.

The typical U.S. household is spending about $460 more every month than they did last year to purchase the same basket of goods and services, said Mark Zandi, chief economist with Moody’s Analytics.

Walmart, the largest retailer in the United States, said some consumers were switching from buying gallons of milk to half-gallons. Walmart customers are also increasingly buying store brands.

Dollar General, the largest U.S. dollar store chain, is seeing its core customers — those with household incomes under $40,000 a year — “start to shop more intentionally,” CEO Todd Vasos said on an earnings call last month.

Gas prices at $5 a gallon are leading some customers to focus on driving to stores located closest to their homes, Vasos added. This is an advantage for Dollar General, which has around 19,000 stores and is often the only retailer in some rural towns.

Dollar General plans to add more $1 items as well as lower-priced, private-label brands to its shelves, the better to appeal to cash-strapped shoppers.

Other discount chains also say they’re attracting new customers seeking cheaper alternatives.

“Consumers are clearly feeling pinched by inflation and looking to stretch their grocery dollar,” R.J. Sheedy, president of Grocery Outlet, said last month. “We have seen more new customers shopping us.”

Contributed by local news sources

Next Post

AP Interview: President Biden says a recession is 'not inevitable'

President Joe Biden told The Associated Press on Thursday that the American people are “really, really down” after a tumultuous two years with the coronavirus pandemic, volatility in the economy and now surging gasoline prices that are slamming family budgets.He said a recession is not inevitable and bristled at claims […]