Mary Golda Ross, the first known Native American female engineer, is being honored with a new statue

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THE BOOKS. SOLEDAD: WHEN YOU BAN A BOOK, UYO RUN THE RISK OF ERANGSI HISTORY. THAT THAT’S A CORE CONCERN FOR OUR NEXT GUEST, AN ENROLLED MEMBER OF THE PAWNEE NATION OF OKLAHOMA. SHE LED THE LARGEST PUBCLI OPINION RESEARCH PROJECT EVER CONDUCTED FOR AND AUTBO NATIVE AMERICANS. SHE’S FOUNDER AND C.E.O.F O ILLUMINATIVE. CRYSTAL, ECHO HAWK. THANKS FOR BEING HERE. >> THANKSOR F HAVING ME. SOLEDAD: LET’S TALK ABOUT THE PROJECT? >> IT’S A 3.3 MLIONIL PROJECT ATTH ASKS ABOUTHE T BACKGROUNDINGS INCLUDGIN INSTITUTIONS LIKE THE GOVERNMENT AND MEDIA AND OERTH SECTORS AND HOW THOSE AFFECT THE WAY NATIVE AMERICANS ARE TREATED IN THIS SOCIETY. SOLEDAD: I’M AFRAID TO ASK FOR THE RESULTS BECAUSE I FEEL LIKE I CAN GUESS SOME OF THEM. NUMBER ONE? >> ERASURE IS THE GREATEST THREAT THAT NATIVE AMERICANS FAILS. UPWARDS OF0% 8 KNOW LITTLE OR NOTHING ABOUT NATIVE AMERICANS. WE ALSO FOUNDHA TT 72% OF AMERICANS RARELY OR NEVER ENCOUNTER ANY INFORMATION ABOUT NATIVE AMERICANS AND THAT ALSTMO 90% OF THE SCHOOLS IN THE COUNTRY DON’T TEACH ABOUT IS PAST 1900 SO GENERATIONS UPON GENERATISON OF ARIMECANS ARE CONDITIONALLED TO THINK THATE W DON’T EVEN EXIST ANYMORE. I THINK WE REALLY BEGAN TO UNDERSTAND THAT WE NEEDED TO DRUM THAT ERASURE AND DO EVERYTHING WE CODUL TO COUNTER THESE STEER TIMES AND FSEAL NARRATIVE THAT ISLL A NATIVE AMERICANS RECEIVE FREE GOVERNNTME BENEFITS. SOLEDAD: YOU FOUND “SHOCKING IGNORANCE AND ANTI–NATIVE BIAS AMGON SOME JURISTS. GIVE ME AN EXAMP.LE >> WE DID A STUDIO FOR JUDGES SITTING ON THE BENCH. THAT 19 JURISDICTION OVER TRIKES, THE FEDERAL COURTS. WE FOUND A MAJORITY OFHE T JUDGES INTERVIEWED HAD NEVER EVEN TAKEN A FRESHNMA INDIAN LAW COURSE. THAT’S LIKE A JUDGE DEANGLI WITH A CASE DEALING ISSUES OVER OVER CONTRACT LAW WHO HAD NEVER TAKEN A COURSE IN THAT YET THAT PERSON IS ISSUING A JUDGMENT NOON CASE. SO THE BIAS EITHER BECAUSE THEY DON’T KNOW ANYTHING OR THEY’RE PULLING IN STEER TIMES ABOUT TRIBES AND OTHER THINGS THAT AFFECT DECISIONS BEING HDEDAN DOWN INHE T COURTS TODAY. SOLEDAD: WHAT’S THE IMPLICATION OF TT?HA >> MURDERED AND INDIGENOUS WOMEN. WE HAVE MORE TNHA 2,700 MISSING OR MURDERED INDIGENOUS WOMEN IN ISTH COUNTRY. AND UP UNTIL RECENY,TL MTOS LAW ENFORCEMENT WOULD NOT EVEN PURSUE THAT. YOU’RE LKIOONG AT AN ENTIRE SYSTEM OF JUSTICE THAT WOULD LOOK THE OERTH WAY AND THAT OUR LIVES WERE LESS VALUED. SOLEDAD: WHENOU Y TALK ABOUT CHANGING THE NARRATIVE AND LEVERAGING MEDIA,S I THAT HOW YOU THINK ABOUT IT? >> WE’RE SHAPING CONTRARY STORIES SO THAT PEOPLE CAN C SEE CONTRARY — CONTEMPORARY REPRESENTATIONS OF US. WE’RE SOAL HOLDING THE MEDIA ACCOUNTABLE WHEN THEY DON’T GET IT RIGHT AS WELL. WE WORK REALLY HARD TO EDUCATE PELEOP AND UNDERSTANDING THERE ARE SO MANY IMPORTANT STORIES TO BE TOLD AROUND INDIAN COUNTRI.ES AND FINALLY WE HAVE OUR FIRST TWO NATIVE AMERICAN TELEVISION SHOWS THAARET OUT. IT’S SUCH A BREAKTHROUGH AND HARD TO BELIEVE THAT IT TOOK THIS LONG BUTHE TY ARE INDIGENOUS CREATED. THERE’S INDIGENOUS WRITERS AND CAST AND PRODUCERS AND DIRECTORS BUT THERE’S SO CHMU MORE WORK TO BE DONE IN NORRENA. SOLEDAD: HAS THERE BEEN A CTOS TO YOU? >> I THINK ABSOLUTELY AND THERE ARE TIMES WNHE YOU WALK INTO THATND A THE LEVEL OF DEHOUSTONNIZATIONST THAT EITHER THAT ERASURE BUT IT DOES TAKE A TOLL. ‘REWE FIGHTERS. WE GET UP EVERY DAY TO SEE TTHA WE MAKE THE CHANGES WE NEED TO MAKE AND ENSURE T

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Mary Golda Ross, the first known Native American female engineer, is being honored with a new statue

Mary Golda Ross was the nation’s first known Native American female engineer and, throughout her career, contributed to essential aerospace technology. Yet, like so many other women in STEM, her name and contributions have been historically overlooked.But this year, in celebration of International Day of Women and Girls in Science, Harper’s BAZAAR and Olay have teamed up with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum to create a new permanent statue honoring Ross. The statue, funded by Olay and designed by StudioEIS, is intended to not only memorialize Ross but to inspire others to pursue their own futures in STEM.Ross, who passed away in 2008 at the age of 99, came from a family of pioneers. According to the Smithsonian, her great-great grandfather, John Ross, was the longest-serving chief of the Cherokee Nation and fought to protect the nation from incoming white settlers. Growing up, Mary Golda Ross studied mathematics at Northeastern State Teachers College in the capital of the Cherokee Nation, and she went on to work at both the Bureau of Indian Affairs and a boarding school for Native Americans. Then during World War II, she was hired at the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, which became a “key military facility during the war,” according to Harper’s BAZAAR. There, Ross worked on the P-38 Lightning fighter plane and later became the only woman on the original team at Lockheed’s Skunk Works, the company’s “then-top-secret think tank,” per the Smithsonian. A 1994 article in the San Jose Mercury News explained that, while on the team, Ross worked on “preliminary design concepts for interplanetary space travel, manned and unmanned earth-orbiting flights, the earliest studies of orbiting satellites for both defense and civilian purposes.” She’s also one of the authors of NASA’s Planetary Flight Handbook Vol. III, which discusses traveling to Venus and Mars. During her retirement, Ross was passionate about advocating for other young women and Native American students to enter the world of STEM, and she was a member of the Society of Women Engineers, which created a scholarship in Ross’s name. On what would’ve been her 110th birthday, her nephew Jeff Ross, told Google: “Her accomplishments are a testament to her determination and love for education. Our hope as a family is that her story inspires young people to pursue a technical career and better the world through science.” Now, starting Feb. 23, you’ll be able to visit Ross’s new statue at the First Americans Museum in Oklahoma City, the mathematician’s home state, and honor her legacy.

Mary Golda Ross was the nation’s first known Native American female engineer and, throughout her career, contributed to essential aerospace technology. Yet, like so many other women in STEM, her name and contributions have been historically overlooked.

But this year, in celebration of International Day of Women and Girls in Science, Harper’s BAZAAR and Olay have teamed up with the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum to create a new permanent statue honoring Ross. The statue, funded by Olay and designed by StudioEIS, is intended to not only memorialize Ross but to inspire others to pursue their own futures in STEM.

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the statue of mary golda ross

Ross, who passed away in 2008 at the age of 99, came from a family of pioneers. According to the Smithsonian, her great-great grandfather, John Ross, was the longest-serving chief of the Cherokee Nation and fought to protect the nation from incoming white settlers. Growing up, Mary Golda Ross studied mathematics at Northeastern State Teachers College in the capital of the Cherokee Nation, and she went on to work at both the Bureau of Indian Affairs and a boarding school for Native Americans.

Then during World War II, she was hired at the Lockheed Aircraft Corporation, which became a “key military facility during the war,” according to Harper’s BAZAAR. There, Ross worked on the P-38 Lightning fighter plane and later became the only woman on the original team at Lockheed’s Skunk Works, the company’s “then-top-secret think tank,” per the Smithsonian. A 1994 article in the San Jose Mercury News explained that, while on the team, Ross worked on “preliminary design concepts for interplanetary space travel, manned and unmanned earth-orbiting flights, the earliest studies of orbiting satellites for both defense and civilian purposes.” She’s also one of the authors of NASA’s Planetary Flight Handbook Vol. III, which discusses traveling to Venus and Mars.

During her retirement, Ross was passionate about advocating for other young women and Native American students to enter the world of STEM, and she was a member of the Society of Women Engineers, which created a scholarship in Ross’s name. On what would’ve been her 110th birthday, her nephew Jeff Ross, told Google: “Her accomplishments are a testament to her determination and love for education. Our hope as a family is that her story inspires young people to pursue a technical career and better the world through science.” Now, starting Feb. 23, you’ll be able to visit Ross’s new statue at the First Americans Museum in Oklahoma City, the mathematician’s home state, and honor her legacy.

Contributed by local news sources

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