Liam and Olivia land at the top of baby names list

parents pull inspiration from all sorts of places to name their babies. Some look at old family records or they name their babies after pop culture phenomena or their hobbies and interests. In 2022 it’s being predicted that unisex names like Luca chi Quinn and Jaden will be trending, spending so much time inside due to the pandemic has made people appreciate nature and the great outdoors more, which has influenced some baby names. According to huffpost names like ivy, Jasper, Parker and Sienna will be popular this year. Names that were popular in the 19 fifties are popping back up again. These are names like nancy, Pamela, Margaret and Dennis. Every parent wants to raise a strong, self confident and independent adult and they want their names to reflect that names like Milo, Alice Nora and Xavier are predicted to be trending in the coming months.

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Liam and Olivia land at the top of baby names list

Olivia and Liam are once again America’s most common baby names. And Theodore joins the top 10 baby names list for the first time.The Social Security Administration annually tracks the names given to girls and boys in each state, with names dating back to 1880. The data is based on applications for Social Security cards. Based on cultural and demographic trends, the list shows how names can rise and fall in popularity. Liam has reigned supreme five years in a row, while Olivia unseated Emma as the top name for the past three years, according to agency’s list, which was released Friday.After Liam, the most common names for boys in respective order: Noah, Oliver, Elijah, James, William, Benjamin, Lucas, Henry and Theodore.And for girls, following Olivia: Emma, Charlotte, Amelia, Ava, Sophia, Isabella, Mia, Evelyn and Harper. The “fastest rising” baby names —which signify the names growing in popularity — are Amiri for boys and Raya for girls. The top male names that have decreased in popularity are Jaxtyn, Karsyn and Xzavier. Various spellings of the name Denise declined in popularity from 2020 to 2021. The Social Security Administration’s latest data shows that 3.64 million babies were born in the U.S. in 2021, which is a slight increase from last year’s 3.6 million babies, but represents an overall decline in the American birthrate. Find the complete list of baby names here.

Olivia and Liam are once again America’s most common baby names. And Theodore joins the top 10 baby names list for the first time.

The Social Security Administration annually tracks the names given to girls and boys in each state, with names dating back to 1880. The data is based on applications for Social Security cards.

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Based on cultural and demographic trends, the list shows how names can rise and fall in popularity.

Liam has reigned supreme five years in a row, while Olivia unseated Emma as the top name for the past three years, according to agency’s list, which was released Friday.

After Liam, the most common names for boys in respective order: Noah, Oliver, Elijah, James, William, Benjamin, Lucas, Henry and Theodore.

And for girls, following Olivia: Emma, Charlotte, Amelia, Ava, Sophia, Isabella, Mia, Evelyn and Harper.

The “fastest rising” baby names —which signify the names growing in popularity — are Amiri for boys and Raya for girls.

The top male names that have decreased in popularity are Jaxtyn, Karsyn and Xzavier. Various spellings of the name Denise declined in popularity from 2020 to 2021.

The Social Security Administration’s latest data shows that 3.64 million babies were born in the U.S. in 2021, which is a slight increase from last year’s 3.6 million babies, but represents an overall decline in the American birthrate.

Find the complete list of baby names here.

Contributed by local news sources

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