‘I’m just happy that they’re safe:’ Woman who fled Ukraine reunited with her parents

There is tremendous relief for a Ukrainian family reunited in United States. They’ve been separated since March, one month before the war broke out in their home country.Liz Shchepetylnykova’s hometown was one of the first to be occupied by Russian forces in eastern Ukraine. Shchepetylnykova and her fiancé fled the country in March, but her parents didn’t have the necessary paperwork, so they had to stay in Ukraine. Now, Shchepetylnykova’s parents were finally able to make the journey to Kansas City, Missouri, to be reunited.”I’m just happy that they’re safe,” Shchepetylnykova said. “You cannot — you cannot imagine how much fear there is among the people in Ukraine that they are going to be forgotten and left alone to die there.”Shchepetylnykova considers Kansas City her second home. She was an exchange student with a family just outside the city more than a decade ago and they’ve embraced her once again, helping her find refuge and working through what seemed like endless red tape to save her parents, too.”They’re so loving and caring that at the time of the greatest needs, you know, and that’s the most terrifying circumstances. They’re the one that wants to step up,” Shchepetylnykova said.While this moment means everything to these families, they cannot forget all those still fighting for their lives.”Unfortunately, a lot of people didn’t have this opportunity and a lot of people are still stuck in the occupied territory so I hope they will get a chance for happy endings themselves,” Shchepetylnykova said.

There is tremendous relief for a Ukrainian family reunited in United States. They’ve been separated since March, one month before the war broke out in their home country.

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Liz Shchepetylnykova’s hometown was one of the first to be occupied by Russian forces in eastern Ukraine. Shchepetylnykova and her fiancé fled the country in March, but her parents didn’t have the necessary paperwork, so they had to stay in Ukraine.

Now, Shchepetylnykova’s parents were finally able to make the journey to Kansas City, Missouri, to be reunited.

“I’m just happy that they’re safe,” Shchepetylnykova said. “You cannot — you cannot imagine how much fear there is among the people in Ukraine that they are going to be forgotten and left alone to die there.”

Shchepetylnykova considers Kansas City her second home. She was an exchange student with a family just outside the city more than a decade ago and they’ve embraced her once again, helping her find refuge and working through what seemed like endless red tape to save her parents, too.

“They’re so loving and caring that at the time of the greatest needs, you know, and that’s the most terrifying circumstances. They’re the one that wants to step up,” Shchepetylnykova said.

While this moment means everything to these families, they cannot forget all those still fighting for their lives.

“Unfortunately, a lot of people didn’t have this opportunity and a lot of people are still stuck in the occupied territory so I hope they will get a chance for happy endings themselves,” Shchepetylnykova said.

Contributed by local news sources

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