‘If I had to pay the supreme price, I’ll pay it’: World War II veteran reflects on service

Peninsula Premier Admin

TWO BEGAN THE WORLD LOOKED ON ETH UNITED STATES WOULD LATER INJO AND FOR ONE UPSTATE VET. MANY LESSONS LEARNED ALONG THE WAY HE SAT DOWN WITH OUR TAGGART HAWK. TO MY KNOWLEDGES I NEVER BEEN A WALL LIKE WORLD WAR TWO EDDIE GARRETT MAY NOT LKOO IT BUT HE’S 96 YEARS OLD AND LIVES BY A KEY MOTTO. I DON’T CARE HOW THEM I THINGS MAY LO ALWAYS TRY TO DO THINGS RIGHT SO IT WOULDN’T SURPRISE YOU TO KNOW THE DUE WEST NATIVE SERVED HIS COUNTRY WITH HONOR DRAFTEDN I 1943. HE TOL AD MILITARY OFFICIAL HE WANTED TO JOIN THE ARMY. SO YOU’RE INHE T NAVY I DIDN’T HAVE NOTHING ELSE TO SAY. RADILSCA I DIDN’T WANT TO BE CHARGED. FOR MUTINARIAN SUBORDINATION AFTER BOOT CAMP HE WAS ON HIS WAY TO THE PACICIF WHERE HE SERVED FROM 1943 TO 1945 IF I HAVE TO PAY THE SUPREME PRICE. I PAY IT WITH NO REGRETS SPENDING TIME IN PEARL HBORAR BEFORE COMING BACK. STATESEID WORLD WAR TWO WAS A NASTY NASTY WALL. THAT WE DON’T TALK ABOUT. WE DIDN’T. SAY THINGS TO ONE ANOTHER ABOUT THE WALL BECAUSE WHEN THEY SDAI RFO BACK TO THE STATE. EVERYBODY WAS GLAD HE’LL ADMIT THERE WERE MOMENTS DURING HIS TIME OF SERVICE. HE FELT HE WASN’T TREATED FAIRLY WORLD WAR TWO. WAS A SURROGATED WALL. WE DIDN’T DO THINGS. TODAY THEN LIKE WEO D TODAY, BUT THINK ABOUT THIS. I DID WHAT I COULD DO. I SERVE FLASH FORWARD MARRIED FOR MORE THAN 75 YEA ARS FAMILY OFIS H OWN MADE POSSIBLE THROUGH HARD WORK. POSITIVE ATTITUDEE B WHAT YOU CAN BE. THE GOOD PTAR VERY GOOD SAMARINTA AND THE TNGHI ABOUT IT IS YOUR REWDAR WILL COME SOONER

Advertisement

‘If I had to pay the supreme price, I’ll pay it’: World War II veteran reflects on service

This week marked the 82nd anniversary of the start of World War II

Eddie Garrett may not look it, but he’s 96 years old. And during his adult life, he’s lived with a motto. “I don’t care how dim or how things may look. Always try to do things right,” he said. So, it wouldn’t surprise you to know the Due West, South Carolina, native, who lives in Greenville, served his country with honor. Drafted in 1943, he told a military official he’d like to join the Army if he had a choice. “He said, ‘You’re in the Navy.’ I didn’t have nothing else to say because I didn’t want to be charged for Mutiny or Insubordination,” Garrett said. After boot camp, he was on his way to the Pacific, where he served from 1943 to 1945. “If I had to pay the supreme price, I’ll pay it,” he said. “But no regrets.”Garrett spent time in Pearl Harbor before coming back stateside.”World War II was a nasty, nasty war that we don’t talk about,” he said. “We didn’t say things to one another about the war, because when we came back to the states, everybody was glad.”He’ll admit, there were times during his service in which he felt he wasn’t treated fairly. “World War II, it was a segregated war. We didn’t do things then like we do today, but the thing about it is, I did what I could do. I served,” he said. Flash forward, today he’s been married for more than 75 years and is proud of his family. But his life now wouldn’t have been possible without his hard work and that positive attitude. “Be what you can be. Be the good part. Be the good Samaritan, and the thing about it is, your reward will come sooner or later,” he said.

Eddie Garrett may not look it, but he’s 96 years old. And during his adult life, he’s lived with a motto.

Advertisement

“I don’t care how dim or how things may look. Always try to do things right,” he said.

So, it wouldn’t surprise you to know the Due West, South Carolina, native, who lives in Greenville, served his country with honor.

Drafted in 1943, he told a military official he’d like to join the Army if he had a choice.

“He said, ‘You’re in the Navy.’ I didn’t have nothing else to say because I didn’t want to be charged for Mutiny or Insubordination,” Garrett said.

After boot camp, he was on his way to the Pacific, where he served from 1943 to 1945.

“If I had to pay the supreme price, I’ll pay it,” he said. “But no regrets.”

Garrett spent time in Pearl Harbor before coming back stateside.

“World War II was a nasty, nasty war that we don’t talk about,” he said. “We didn’t say things to one another about the war, because when we came back to the states, everybody was glad.”

He’ll admit, there were times during his service in which he felt he wasn’t treated fairly.

“World War II, it was a segregated war. We didn’t do things then like we do today, but the thing about it is, I did what I could do. I served,” he said.

Flash forward, today he’s been married for more than 75 years and is proud of his family.

But his life now wouldn’t have been possible without his hard work and that positive attitude.

“Be what you can be. Be the good part. Be the good Samaritan, and the thing about it is, your reward will come sooner or later,” he said.

Contributed by local news sources

Next Post

The housing market boom could last a little longer than expected, experts say

Last month, CNN’s Before the Bell observed early signs that the red-hot global housing market could be starting to cool, as elevated prices appeared to hurt demand and home improvement spending eased.It may have called the top too soon.What’s happening? U.S. home prices rose 18.6% in June compared to one […]