How will the SCOTUS decision striking down the NY gun law impact California? Expert explains

On Thursday morning, the Supreme Court struck down a restrictive New York gun law in a major ruling for gun rights.The justices’ 6-3 decision is expected to ultimately allow more people to legally carry guns on the streets of the nation’s largest cities — including New York, Los Angeles and Boston — and elsewhere.| MORE | Supreme Court strikes down New York gun law in major rulingAbout a quarter of the U.S. population lives in states expected to be affected by the ruling, the high court’s first major gun decision in more than a decade.Leslie Jacobs, McGeorge law professor, explained to KCRA 3 that the ruling is not exactly unexpected.”The court heard this case having to do with whether to expand the gun right that it found to be in the Second Amendment 20 years ago. And so it nevertheless is a very significant decision because it goes even farther than people may have expected,” Jacobs said. She added that the ruling expands the gun right that previously existed just within one’s home for self-defense, to a right to carry outside the home.So how does this decision impact California? California had a similar law to New York’s, which is often called a “may issue” — meaning that when someone applied for a license to carry a gun outside the home, the person had to show reasonable cause to do it. A sheriff would then make a decision based on their reasonings, Jacobs said. But what the nation’s highest court decided Thursday was that states can’t demand reasons, moving it from a “may issue” to a “shall issue.””It means that California can’t apply the stricter rule, which is that reasonable cause is required. It means that California will have to have rules that say that if you apply, you can get the gun simply by meeting various application criteria,” Jacobs said.Shortly after the decision was announced, California Gov. Gavin Newsom said it was “a dark day in America.””This is a dangerous decision from a court hell bent on pushing a radical ideological agenda and infringing on the rights of states to protect our citizens from being gunned down in our streets, schools, and churches. Shameful,” he said in a Tweet. The Supreme Court’s ruling comes as Congress actively works on gun legislation following mass shootings in Texas, New York and California.

On Thursday morning, the Supreme Court struck down a restrictive New York gun law in a major ruling for gun rights.

The justices’ 6-3 decision is expected to ultimately allow more people to legally carry guns on the streets of the nation’s largest cities — including New York, Los Angeles and Boston — and elsewhere.

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| MORE | Supreme Court strikes down New York gun law in major ruling

About a quarter of the U.S. population lives in states expected to be affected by the ruling, the high court’s first major gun decision in more than a decade.

Leslie Jacobs, McGeorge law professor, explained to KCRA 3 that the ruling is not exactly unexpected.

“The court heard this case having to do with whether to expand the gun right that it found to be in the Second Amendment 20 years ago. And so it nevertheless is a very significant decision because it goes even farther than people may have expected,” Jacobs said.

She added that the ruling expands the gun right that previously existed just within one’s home for self-defense, to a right to carry outside the home.

So how does this decision impact California?

California had a similar law to New York’s, which is often called a “may issue” — meaning that when someone applied for a license to carry a gun outside the home, the person had to show reasonable cause to do it. A sheriff would then make a decision based on their reasonings, Jacobs said.

But what the nation’s highest court decided Thursday was that states can’t demand reasons, moving it from a “may issue” to a “shall issue.”

“It means that California can’t apply the stricter rule, which is that reasonable cause is required. It means that California will have to have rules that say that if you apply, you can get the gun simply by meeting various application criteria,” Jacobs said.

Shortly after the decision was announced, California Gov. Gavin Newsom said it was “a dark day in America.”

“This is a dangerous decision from a court hell bent on pushing a radical ideological agenda and infringing on the rights of states to protect our citizens from being gunned down in our streets, schools, and churches. Shameful,” he said in a Tweet.

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The Supreme Court’s ruling comes as Congress actively works on gun legislation following mass shootings in Texas, New York and California.

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