DACA’s 10th anniversary

Wednesday marks the 10th anniversary of DACA.DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program.Former President Barack Obama introduced the program in 2012 to give eligible immigrants who came as children protection from deportation.The program impacts more than 800,000 people, including Adriana González Sebastián, a former DACA student, college graduate, and now a DACA professional.“Just thinking that ten years later, there is still no solution. There needs to be something. And maybe starting with people who have DACA is a start,” Adriana said.She says that many wish for a solution for the 11 million undocumented people, but DACA is at least a start.“And even if there are certain individuals who may not want me here, I have experienced many more who do,” Adriana said.When talking about growing up, Adriana remembers struggling with mental health challenges while trying to find her own identity. Adriana said that she is more than her undocumented status.She is a professional who wants to contribute to her community.Congressman Jimmy Panetta says that immigrants impact and contribute much here on the Central Coast.“We are lucky enough on the central coast that we know the benefits of what immigrants provide to our community, our culture, and of course our economy,” Panetta said.Panetta says many of these men and women contribute to the country’s lack of labor force.“That’s why we at the House of Representatives are fighting for them and the passage of the Dream and Promise act. It’s time for the Senate to do its job and take up that bill and do the same thing,” Panetta said.For years, the program has been on shaky ground. This uncertainty has left immigrants, known as dreamers, fearful that a single court order could change their lives forever.Clementina Macias, director of College Support Programs at California State Monterey Bay, says that students at her university can invest in themselves and the community without fear with DACA.“ Our students are also majoring in and pursuing careers that are making a positive impact in the country,” Macias said.Miriam Vazquez-Gonzalez, an undocumented liaison for Hartnell College, says that DACA has impacted the lives of their students and community.“We really have seen how students that are DACA recipients have gone beyond the community college education and have pursued their careers and became professional DACA recipients,” she said.Regardless of where DACA stands, Vazquez-Gonzalez said that education for undocumented students persists, and the Hartnell Mi Casa Center will continue serving its undocumented students.

Wednesday marks the 10th anniversary of DACA.

DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program.

Advertisement

Former President Barack Obama introduced the program in 2012 to give eligible immigrants who came as children protection from deportation.

The program impacts more than 800,000 people, including Adriana González Sebastián, a former DACA student, college graduate, and now a DACA professional.

“Just thinking that ten years later, there is still no solution. There needs to be something. And maybe starting with people who have DACA is a start,” Adriana said.

She says that many wish for a solution for the 11 million undocumented people, but DACA is at least a start.

“And even if there are certain individuals who may not want me here, I have experienced many more who do,” Adriana said.

When talking about growing up, Adriana remembers struggling with mental health challenges while trying to find her own identity. Adriana said that she is more than her undocumented status.

She is a professional who wants to contribute to her community.

Congressman Jimmy Panetta says that immigrants impact and contribute much here on the Central Coast.

“We are lucky enough on the central coast that we know the benefits of what immigrants provide to our community, our culture, and of course our economy,” Panetta said.

Panetta says many of these men and women contribute to the country’s lack of labor force.

“That’s why we at the House of Representatives are fighting for them and the passage of the Dream and Promise act. It’s time for the Senate to do its job and take up that bill and do the same thing,” Panetta said.

For years, the program has been on shaky ground. This uncertainty has left immigrants, known as dreamers, fearful that a single court order could change their lives forever.

Clementina Macias, director of College Support Programs at California State Monterey Bay, says that students at her university can invest in themselves and the community without fear with DACA.

“ Our students are also majoring in and pursuing careers that are making a positive impact in the country,” Macias said.

Miriam Vazquez-Gonzalez, an undocumented liaison for Hartnell College, says that DACA has impacted the lives of their students and community.

“We really have seen how students that are DACA recipients have gone beyond the community college education and have pursued their careers and became professional DACA recipients,” she said.

Regardless of where DACA stands, Vazquez-Gonzalez said that education for undocumented students persists, and the Hartnell Mi Casa Center will continue serving its undocumented students.

Contributed by local news sources

Next Post

From social media threat to arrest, former FBI agents share insight

How do authorities go from a threat on social media to making an arrest? Sister station KMBC 9 asked two former FBI agents about the process of tracking down a suspect and how recent mass shootings have heightened the response to threats. When a threat is made on social media, […]