As life returns to normal in some displaced by CZU Lightning Fire others still struggling

Nearly two years since the start of the CZU Lightning Fire, fire survivors continue to struggle through the rebuilding process.More than 86,000 acres burned and 911 homes were destroyed. Despite efforts to speed up re-building, it’s been a slow, tedious and expensive process.This Summer is the first opportunity for fire survivors to focus on rebuilding rather than removing debris off their property.Santa Cruz County Supervisors created the Recovery Permit Center to help fire survivors navigate through the red tape for rebuilding.The Director of the Office of Response, Recovery and Resilience says, “There’s a learning curve for everybody in the rebuild process. It’s a complicated area to rebuild. It’s not like we’re in the urban environment. So, for folks learning and understanding what they need to go through. The process has definitely been streamlined and expediated but for many folks it’s relearning that process.”Now, they are facing higher construction costs and a lack of trade people to do the work.Susan True is the CEO for the Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County which works closely with disaster case managers to provide funding.”Those funds are available for fire survivors through our disaster care management managers. So, organizations: Catholic Charities, Mountain Community Resources and Davenport resource center can help fire survivors to apply for funds to help with their rebuilding,” said True. And while survivors work through the rebuilding process, there are other signs of things returning so some normalThe Boulder Creek Golf and Country Club reopened for golfers and others Tuesday for the first time in almost two years.”My son, my Uncle Bud and my dad hav been coming out here on Tuesdays, so how appropriate they’ve reopened on a Tuesday. We call it Teed up Tuesday,” said Luke Dahlen of Felton.The landscape has certainly changed with a half-million dollars in renovations.”We’ve rebuilt the greens with U.S.G.A. Specks. They’re going to be around for 50 years, already the root structure is this long We think we’ve got a nice product. We really think we have a beautiful spot. I mean, this 9 holes there’s nothing like it anymore, so we’re pretty excited.” said, Bill Aragona, President and CEO of Boulder Creek Country Club.For now, there are nine holes only and the back nine is used for disc golfing.The clubhouse, restaurant, and even the 60-year-old restrooms are modernized.

Nearly two years since the start of the CZU Lightning Fire, fire survivors continue to struggle through the rebuilding process.

More than 86,000 acres burned and 911 homes were destroyed. Despite efforts to speed up re-building, it’s been a slow, tedious and expensive process.

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This Summer is the first opportunity for fire survivors to focus on rebuilding rather than removing debris off their property.

Santa Cruz County Supervisors created the Recovery Permit Center to help fire survivors navigate through the red tape for rebuilding.

The Director of the Office of Response, Recovery and Resilience says,

“There’s a learning curve for everybody in the rebuild process. It’s a complicated area to rebuild. It’s not like we’re in the urban environment. So, for folks learning and understanding what they need to go through. The process has definitely been streamlined and expediated but for many folks it’s relearning that process.”

Now, they are facing higher construction costs and a lack of trade people to do the work.

Susan True is the CEO for the Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County which works closely with disaster case managers to provide funding.

“Those funds are available for fire survivors through our disaster care management managers. So, organizations: Catholic Charities, Mountain Community Resources and Davenport resource center can help fire survivors to apply for funds to help with their rebuilding,” said True.

And while survivors work through the rebuilding process, there are other signs of things returning so some normal

The Boulder Creek Golf and Country Club reopened for golfers and others Tuesday for the first time in almost two years.

“My son, my Uncle Bud and my dad hav been coming out here on Tuesdays, so how appropriate they’ve reopened on a Tuesday. We call it Teed up Tuesday,” said Luke Dahlen of Felton.

The landscape has certainly changed with a half-million dollars in renovations.

“We’ve rebuilt the greens with U.S.G.A. Specks. They’re going to be around for 50 years, already the root structure is this long We think we’ve got a nice product. We really think we have a beautiful spot. I mean, this 9 holes there’s nothing like it anymore, so we’re pretty excited.” said, Bill Aragona, President and CEO of Boulder Creek Country Club.

For now, there are nine holes only and the back nine is used for disc golfing.

The clubhouse, restaurant, and even the 60-year-old restrooms are modernized.

Contributed by local news sources

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